Where Public Health Fits Into the Health Picture

ClimbingParaguay and Health Care

Every country has it’s own way of trying to protect its citizens’ right to health. In Paraguay, there is universal health care. This means that consults and medications are free. Well, at least that’s the idea. Most people have access to doctors and nurses trained in family medicine, but things get complicated when it comes to medications and access to specialists.

Every medical facility in Paraguay doesn’t always get all the medications it needs for its patients. (Paraguay is working to decentralize its medical system with the hope to reduce some of the bureaucracy that might be contributing to these shortages.) As for specialized care, it’s unsustainable for every health clinic to have specialist in all areas, so they are centralized regionally in hospitals and health centers.

These limitations sometimes mean individuals go without the medications or care they need. Public health has a role to play to help relieve strain on the health care system by helping people lead healthier lives in the first place.

Barriers to Medicines and Specialized Care When They Are Not Available in Local Clinics

The main barrier is access. When a local clinic doesn’t have a needed medication patients must either buy it or find a public health facility that has the medication.

For families where money is short or income is unreliable, it means individuals go without their medications—a scary thought in a land where hypertension and diabetes are leading conditions.

Traveling to another medical facility might also be out of the question. It costs money to travel—whether by bus, by dirt bike, or by car. What’s more, it takes time that individuals might not have. For those who work, they can’t be absent from their jobs. And, for those who are looking after a house, there’s food to cook, children to watch, and clothes to wash.

When patients have to travel to a regional facility for care they face the same challenges as accessing medications. It’s not uncommon for local health care providers to use their personal money and vehicles to help people see specialists. But, that is limited because it puts stress on health care providers beyond their normal work and their vehicles may not fit everyone who needs to see a specialist.

There’s no silver bullet for resolving barriers preventing people from the health care they need. But, one thing is for sure; the more we can do to help prevent illness the better off individuals will be. That’s why health education and providing individuals with advice on how to lead healthier lives makes a difference.

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